Halloween 101: How to Safely Consume THC Edibles

Halloween is coming up, so it’s time to don your best costume and learn how to eat THC edibles safely! Cannabis edibles are incredibly popular and come in enticing forms like candies, cookies, and even drinks, making them perfect for Halloween. The only downside of their many delicious forms is that you have to be careful you don’t eat too much!

Sometimes people aren’t aware of just how potent edibles can be, and end up having a negative experience. We’ll teach you how to consume THC edibles safely so you can have a spooky, yet enjoyable experience this Halloween.

 

Start Low and Slow

The safest way to consume an edible is to go little by little and see how you react to a given amount of THC, this process is called titration. We know that it may sound boring, but trust us, having one bad experience could be enough to make you swear them off forever.

The beginning dose for someone who has never done an edible is about 1-5mg THC, with 2.5mg being enough to usually induce psychoactivity in a non-consumer. Take into account, some edibles have an insanely high THC content, even up to 2000mg THC! Many edibles, especially gummies, have easy to dose pieces. However, it may not always be apparent exactly how much THC is in a given part of an edible. Especially prevalent in confections, this phenomenon is known as a “hot spot” of THC, which can be extremely detrimental to consumers needing accurate dosing. Our gummies are coated individually by hand and are lab tested prior to and post-infusion, meaning that every piece is accurately dosed.

For all edibles, and especially confections, it’s wise to eat a small piece and wait until you feel an effect. Don’t be anxious and rush to take more if you don’t feel anything after just 10 or 20 minutes, edibles can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 1.5 hours for the effects to take hold.

After you feel the peak effects of the edible (which can take up to 3 hours), you need to decide if you want to take more. If not, then congratulations! You’ve found a dose that works well for you. If you want more or don’t feel anything, then take another small piece and repeat the process until you’re satisfied.

 

Why So Long To Kick In?

The long wait time is what makes the experimentation worth it in the end. Too often, people will consume too much of an edible and find themselves overly medicated hours later. The reason why it takes so long is the way that our body processes the edibles.

When we eat edibles, the THC needs to make it into our blood for us to feel anything. For it to do this, it needs to go through a lengthy process. Basically, the edibles need to travel through the extensive digestive system until the THC can be absorbed and processed by the liver, finally making it to the blood.

The process is complex and different than smoking THC, but luckily we have an in-depth article explaining the differences available for reading as well.

  

Make Yourself Comfortable

Sometimes the difference between a pleasant or frightening edible experience depends on where you consume it. Since edibles take time to hit you, it’s a good idea to hunker down in a space where you’re nice and comfortable.

That space can be your own house or apartment, a park, or with close friends or family you trust. You definitely don’t want to be in a situation that could be dangerous if you suddenly find yourself overly medicated, such as driving. Alternatively, being at a Halloween party may not be harmful, but it could be very uncomfortable if the edible is too strong.

Once edibles hit you, their effects can last a whopping 4 to 12 hours. If the onset can already take a few hours, then the entire procedure of eating an edible can last the entire day. So it’s a good practice to wait for a day where you have no obligations, and your schedule is totally free. If you do find yourself too intoxicated, being in a safe and familiar place with nothing to do can ease the anxiety and panic that may take hold of you in other situations.

 

Be Aware of Factors That Will Influence the Power of an Edible

If two people take the exact same dosage of an edible, there’s a slim chance that they’ll both feel the same thing or the same way. One person might be uncomfortably high while the other doesn’t feel much at all. The reason behind this is all the varying factors between each one of us.

These factors are age, weight, metabolism, tolerance, liver enzymes, and much more. Even the amount of food in your stomach will impact your experience. All of these factors contribute to an “edible roulette” where you may not know how an edible will affect you, unless you have done some experimentation.

 

*Not A Treat For Kids*

The only frightening thing on Halloween should be all the ghouls and ghosts, and not a panic attack due to your child accidentally eating a THC edible. During this month, candies are everywhere, and leaving your edibles around can be especially dangerous to kids who are curious and love to eat every sweet they can get a hold of.

These days, most packaging is required to have childproof safety to keep small children from getting ahold of strong THC products. However, the biggest defense against your kids eating THC edibles is by storing them in a highly secure place.

By storing your potent edibles in a place where your child has absolutely no access to them, you can keep your Halloween fun instead of risking a trip to the emergency room.

 

Easy Does It

After reading this article, it may seem like cannabis-infused edibles are a force to be reckoned with. However, edibles can play an enjoyable role in Halloween fun if you follow our tips. It’s also essential that you never feel pressured into consuming more than you’re comfortable with. By starting slow, being aware of your body and surroundings, and ESPECIALLY making sure you store your edibles safely – you should have a great and fun-filled Halloween experience!

 

 

 

 

References:

  • Barrus, D., Capogrossi, K., Cates, S., Gourdet, C., Peiper, N., Novak, S., … Wiley, J. (2016). Tasty THC: Promises and Challenges of Cannabis Edibles. Methods report (RTI Press). https://doi.org/10.3768/rtipress.2016.op.0035.161
  • Grotenhermen, F. (2003). Grotenhermen F. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids. Clin Pharmacokinet 42: 327-360. Clinical Pharmacokinetics, 42(4), 327–360. https://doi.org/10.2165/00003088-200342040-00003
  • Stott, C. G., White, L., Wright, S., Wilbraham, D., & Guy, G. W. (2013). A phase I study to assess the effect of food on the single dose bioavailability of the THC/CBD oromucosal spray. European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 69(4), 825–834. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00228-012-1393-4
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